Friday, September 23, 2011

Fall Equinox

We go down as She goes down
We follow Her underground
Hail to Inanna
Who dies to become whole

And deep calls to deep
Deep calls to deep
And deep calls to deep
Deep calls to deep

The veils drop by on our way
As we pass through the gates
With Inanna as our guide
We find truth in deepest night

And deep calls to deep
Deep calls to deep
And deep calls to deep
Deep calls to deep

We go down as She goes down
We follow Her underground
Hail to Inanna
Who dies to become whole

And deep calls to deep (deep calls to deep)
Deep calls to deep (deep calls to deep)
And deep calls to deep (deep calls to deep)
Deep calls to deep

-- "Inanna," Suzanne Sterling; 
recorded on Reclaiming's "Second Chants"


Fall Equinox

Fall Equinox.  Mabon.  The second harvest and the Witches' Thanksgiving.  Inanna's descent.  Day and night in balance.  The beginning of the darker half of the year. 


Queries  

Ground and center, or settle into worship.

Breathe, and ask yourself:
  • As I look around me, what changes have I noticed in nature since the beginning of August?  (Take a moment before going on the next query.)
  • What local foods are coming into season now where I live?  (Take a moment before going on the next query.)
  • As I take stock in my life right now, what do I find I am thankful for, in this moment?
A blessed Fall Equinox to you.

    3 comments:

    staśa said...

    Just after Lammas, I moved from the Mid-Atlantic region of the US, near the 40th parallel north, to Scotland, near the 56th parallel north. (The furthest north I'd ever lived before was between the 47th and 48th parallels.)

    One of the changes I've really noticed in the last six weeks is that the sun rises later and sets earlier. By how much?, I wondered, and so I looked it up:

    On 1 August (Lammas) at my new home:
    - civil twilight started at 3:22 am (!)
    - sunrise was at 4:13 am
    - sunset was at 8:24 pm
    - civil twilight ended at 9:13 pm

    On 23 September (Fall Equinox):
    - civil twilight started at 5:21 am
    - sunrise was at 5:59 am
    - sunset was at 6:10 pm
    - civil twilight ended at 6:48 pm

    So -- sunrise is about an hour and 45 minutes later, and sunset is about an hour and 15 minutes earlier. That's almost 3 fewer hours of daylight (!).

    What else have I noticed?

    There are leaves starting to turn. And there are leaves starting to fall. (Our roses are still going strong, though!)

    The temperature is cooler. I've generally started wearing another layer when I go out during the day; sometimes I'll take it off and stuff it in my backpack, but more often I leave it on.

    I definitely live someplace different now. I love it, and I love learning it.

    I have an entire post brewing about what's in season at the farmers market.

    Last week, Beloved Wife and I went to a Scottish dance class. And I find myself deeply grateful for improved health -- for the lessening of pain, for better breathing, for better neurological functioning, for better health and stamina overall. I am grateful for and to my body for so many things.

    I am grateful for health.

    I am grateful to be living in Edinburgh right now, and the joy that being here seems to be bringing me.

    I am grateful for the nature of the sunshine here.

    I am grateful for the wonderful food we've had since moving here.

    Happy Thanksgiving! Happy Equinox!

    Hystery said...

    I live in an agricultural region. Beginning in August, I notice the farm stands and their abundant produce. We see tomatoes, cucumbers, summer squash, corn and cabbage in our gardens, in the fields, and in the markets. In September, we add pumpkins, winter squash, grapes, and apples to the list. The nights grow more chilled, the air is not so heavy, and there are leaves dancing on the breeze even before the full autumn colors overtake us.

    In the summer months and into August, I notice the green smell of corn ripening. In September, the air is perfumed with the scent of grapes and apples. The light has a more golden quality to it too. Sometimes, even in the darkening sky, the leaves turn their silver underbellies to the sun so that the world becomes like a medieval illumination.

    I am thankful for this light. I'm thankful for the gathering of crows that fill the fields after harvest. They remind me that we are not alone in the universe. I am thankful for my own family, for our gathering together each night, and for the children's play. I'm thankful for white sails on blue lakes, for bushels of honeycrisp apples, cheerful mums, milkweed, wooly bear caterpillars, pumpkins, grape pies, casseroles, and cardigan sweaters.

    staśa said...

    Mmmmmm. Blessed be.